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Street Art: The Evolution of Graffiti

Street Art: The Evolution of #Graffiti #streetart #art #urbanart

Ushuaia Wall, Street Art

Ushuaia, Argetina. This mural portrays the indigenous peoples of Tierra del Fuego.

Graffiti. Art? Eyesore? Vandalism or outlet of free expression? Does it bring a neighborhood down, or can it raise one up? Moving to New York in the late 80s, there was a “war on graffiti” in full swing, and the subways were being wiped clean of the blight as part of the Clean Train movement. While removing…

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Colombia Travel Route and Tips for Planning a Visit

#Colombia Travel Route + Tips for Planning a Visit #travel #ttot #traveltips

Bogota
[mappress mapid=”25”]

This post is the index to our trip to Colombia in March/April 2014. It will be updated with links as new stories and tips are posted, so check back often! Our Colombia travel route is shown on the map above. Click on markers and lines for more information. Green lines represent travel over land. Red lines were flights (which we got really lucky with price-wise!).

The Hardest…

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Food for Thought with Hungry Escapades

***New Post*** Food for Thought with Hungry Escapades #food #foodie #travel @hungryescapades

We believe that to truly experience a culture, you must taste it. Throughout our travels, we continue to make meaningful connections that we never would otherwise. Through our Food for Thought series, we hope to learn more about other travelers’ journeys, and the important role food plays. A new installment will be published each Friday for the duration of the series. This week’s interview is…

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Cartagena Doors

To say we took a lot of photos in Cartagena is an understatement. The doors of Cartagena in particular continuously stopped us in our tracks, begging us to photograph them.  We’re not sure if it’s the sheer size, the interesting design of smaller, inset doors, the ornate door knockers or the endless variety of colors and details. Cartagena doors seem to reach back in time. (Click on any image to see a larger version.)

The colonial city of Cartagena de Indias, on Colombia’s northern coast, was officially founded in 1533, and the Colonial period lasted for almost 200 years after that. The whole walled city was named a UNESCO World Heritage site in the mid 1980s. The historic neighborhoods of the walled city contain some gorgeous examples of colonial architecture. There are also some repubican and Italian-style buildings. What we were drawn to the most though was Cartagena doors.

Some Cartagena doors have small windows protected by a set of metal bars to see who is knocking; others have panels that open near the top in order to let in the breeze. That would have been an essential feature for homes in this steamy city in the days before air conditioning. Inner patios or courtyards are another heat-releasing design feature of colonial Spanish architecture. You can catch a glimpse of some of these open spaces behind Cartagena doors. These courtyards contain seating, maybe a hammock, and often trellises of plants or flowers, like the ever-present purple or white bougainvillea. Flowers also adorn the beautiful balconies, another common Cartagena building feature.

Almost all of the doors tower at least ten feet or more. The smaller, inset “man doors” allow people to go in and out, and tend to be shorter than the average person today. The only time we saw the larger, outer door open was on a building under reconstruction.

The color combinations of Cartagena doors vary wildly. Some are plain white, with frames chosen to set off the paint of the house or business. Hanging vines and flowers are additional decoration and add even more color. If the door is left “wood” color, it’s usually a dark, rich stain. Wrought iron hinges, door knockers and ornamental accents make each door unique. Much of the metalwork looks original, and handmade. We spent a lot of time studying the door knockers as well. Those will be covered in another post!

Infinitely Photogenic: Cartagena Doors: #photography #photo #travel #colombia #architecture #doors To say we took a lot of photos in Cartagena is an understatement. The doors of Cartagena in particular continuously stopped us in our tracks, begging us to photograph them.  
Food for Thought with Eating the Globe

**NEW POST** Food for Thought with Eating the Globe #foodie #nomnom #travel #ttot @eatingtheglobe

To truly experience a culture, you have to taste it. Eating local cuisine, we make meaningful connections that we never would otherwise. The Food for Thought series, explores the integral role food plays in travel. A new installment will be published each Friday for the duration of the series. This week we talk to Valen Dawson of Eating the Globe. Her passion for food is evident in every post she…

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Villa de Leyva: Colonial Town in a High-Altitude Valley

Villa de Leyva: Colonial Town in a High-Altitude Valley #Colombia #travel #ttot @colombia_travel @colombiatravels

Puente Boyaca

Puente de Boyaca

The Road to Villa de Leyva

Villa de Leyvais tucked into the mountains a few hours’ drive north of Bogotá. Traffic was heavy getting out of the city on the holiday weekend we set out, but we still had time to make a stop at a very important historic site. Just before the city of Tunja, once you’ve entered the Department of Boyacá is a reconstruction of the bridge where a famous…

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Food for Thought with Eat Your World

**NEW POST** Food for Thought with Eat Your World #foodie #nomnom #food #culture @eat_your_world

It’s true, “To truly experience a culture, you must taste it.” Often, when we travel, we make meaningful connections through food that we never would otherwise. Through our Food for Thought series, we hope to learn more about other travelers’ journeys, and the important role food plays. A new interview is published each Friday. This week, we are excited to share the perspectives of Scott and…

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Colombian Hospitality: Intro to Bogota

Colombian Hospitality: Intro to Bogota #travel #Colombia #culture

View from Cerro Monserrate

View from Cerro Monserrate

Hospitality

Every culture has its own form of hospitality. Some people make us feel at home right away, while for others it takes more time to warm up to new people and new situations. As an exchange student in Japan, my “favorite” host family, the one I still keep in touch with, welcomed me as a member of the family early on. It was a feeling of warmth and security I…

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Food for Thought with Peanuts or Pretzels

**NEW POST** Food for Thought with Peanuts or Pretzels #foodie #nomnom #travel @PeanutsPretzels

Through our Food for Thought series, we talk to travelers and food/travel bloggers to discover their perspectives on the role food plays in their journeys. A new installment is posted each Friday for the duration of the series. This week we hear from our friends Josh and Liz from Peanuts or Pretzels. These two have an enthusiasm that is contagious. Their love of travel has taken them to many…

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Food for Thought with 2 Food Trippers

***New*** Food for Thought with 2 Food Trippers #food #travel #nomnom #foodie @2foodtrippers

Through a country’s cuisine, we make meaningful connections that we never would otherwise. Through our Food for Thought series, we explore the idea that “To truly experience a culture, you must taste it.”  We hope to learn more about other travelers’ journeys, and the integral role food plays. A new interview will be published each Friday for the duration of the series. This installment is with…

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